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Strategic Airport Business Plans

Overview:

 

Strategic Airport Business Plans are designed to improve an airport’s financial performance, economic development, and operation. Airport sponsors are continually exploring revenue producing opportunities including development of airport real property reserves and concession development.

 

While the overall airport master plan guides the general direction and scope of airport development, there is frequently a need to see how the airport fits into its economic environment, its competitive environment, and its market niche. Many times, these studies will identify alternative sources of revenue and new marketing opportunities.

 

Airport Business Plans are federally fundable and R.A. Wiedemann & Associates has participated in 65 of these studies in fifteen states to date.

 

Strategic Airport Business Planning:

 

Strategic Airport Business Plans are intended to provide an overview analysis the airport. This includes financial planning analysis, assessment of business/economic development opportunities, and recommend a strategic course of action to pursue development and address issues. The Strategic Business Plans examine a short history of revenue and expense performance and then project financials for a 5 to 10 year forecast period. Strategic planning for market niche fit, development of unused airport property, management structure changes and other innovative methods are used to examine the potential for enhanced revenues at the airport. The economic impact of the airport with and without recommended changes is also estimated.

 

Listed below are numerous recent airport business planning projects completed by R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. Click on each one to view additional details.

• Scholes International Airport at Galveston (TX) Business Plan: 2013

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform a strategic business plan for Scholes International Airport at Galveston. This airport is located on Galveston Island in the southern end of the Houston metroplex. The airport serves six helicopter transportation services that transport workers to and from oil drilling and production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The airport has a large land area and has two major non-aviation tenants: Moody Gardens and Schlitterbahn Water Park. These two attractions draw more than 2 million visitors each year. In recent years, aviation activity has declined and the airport desires a plan that will increase revenues and take advantage of the large infrastructure available. Hurricane Ike physically damaged the airport and also damaged its brand. As such, the airport has already made changes to protect tenants against harsh storms. The business plan has identified a number of potential growth opportunities for the airport and a plan for implementing these changes has been developed.

 

• South Texas Regional Airport at Hondo (TX) Business Plan: 2013

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates was retained by the City of Hondo to develop a strategic blueprint for moving its Airport into the future, and take advantage of the growing connection between local business/industrial development and aviation in the South Texas/San Antonio region. A growing rail yard and transloading facility at the south end of the Airport connects the facility with the energy exploration activities of the Eagle Ford Shale, along with agricultural production and raw materials transport. The City had developed a vision plan for the industrial park surrounding the Airport and needed a business plan for the aviation side to attract businesses and users that will help the Airport achieve its new potential. The business plan included several components: the potential release and/or highest and best use of Airport property, the recent departure of U.S. Aviation Academy, the benefits and costs of attracting corporate aviation, the potential for hangar development, the identification of revenue-producing development options for the Airport’s landside areas, the development of a brand for the Airport and City, and a number of other facility-related issues. The resulting plan has equipped the City to move into the future with assurance of greater financial production.

 

• Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport (ND) Business Plan: 2013

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected as part of a team to perform an airport master plan and business plan for Dickinson Airport in ND. Dickinson is an Essential Air Service airport and until recently, had minimal airline service to Denver, CO. That has all changed with the discovery of the Bakken Oil Shale discovery in western ND. Airline traffic has grown from roughly 5,000 enplanements in 2006 to more than 27,000 in 2012. Delta and United Airlines began airline service to the community in June of 2013. Forecasts estimate more than 100,000 enplanements by 2022. This action will transform the Airport into a self-sufficient economic engine for the community. Significant new development is needed in the terminal area to accommodate the dramatic growth in passenger traffic. In addition, a shift in pricing policies was outlined to help pay for the increased infrastructure development and maintenance. R.A. Wiedemann developed the forecasts of GA demand, provided strategic evaluation of alternatives, and performed airport business planning components of financial forecasts, rates and charges, debt service recommendations, and strategic management recommendations. This project began in May of 2012 and was completed in May of 2013.

 

• Ashtabula County Airport Business and Marketing Plan (OH): 2012

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform a business plan with a distinct follow-on marketing program for the Ashtabula County Airport in northeast Ohio. The Airport is located between Cleveland and Erie (PA) and serves a growing area of business, energy exploration (Utica Shale), and a large specialty sports complex. The business plan is being undertaken in order to provide the Airport Authority with a business model for operating the airport. In the past, it has been run as a public utility, not a customer-oriented business. As a part of the business plan, the economic impact of the airport will be assessed. Already the name of the Airport has been changed to Northeast Ohio Regional Airport as a part of a new branding program. The marketing plan will take each of the business planning recommendations and implement those through various marketing means. The process will result in a new brand for the airport, including website, logo, name change, and direct marketing for corporate aviation.

 

• Columbia County Airport (NY) Business Plan: 2011

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform a business plan for Columbia County Airport. The purpose of the business plan was to develop decision-level information that the County could use to chart the future course of the Airport. In addition, the plan studied operational and managerial issues to determine if there are better or more efficient methods that could be used. To accomplish this, an examination of the financial production of the Airport was made and reported in pro formas. There was a significant amount of land that could be utilized for both airside and landside development, and with a 5,350-foot runway Columbia County Airport is positioned as the service area leader of in terms of runway length and airfield design.

 

The plan was founded upon an understanding of current activities at the Airport and the recommended plan of action rested on five primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airport Branding and Marketing, 2) Hangar Development and Activity Growth, 3) Non-Aeronautical Land Development, 4) Improved Operational Controls and Standards, and 5) Expanded Partnerships.

 

• Saratoga County Airport (NY) Business Plan: 2011

 

Saratoga County Airport selected R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. to perform an Airport Business Plan in 2011. An examination of the financial production of the Airport was made and reported in pro formas. In addition, the plan studied operational and managerial issues to determine if there were better or more efficient methods that could be used. The plan was founded upon an understanding of current activities at the Airport and set forth options to address a number of key areas: marketing for aviation users and non-aeronautical business, potential impact of Global Foundries at Luther Forest Technology Park on the need for aviation services in the area, the removal of obstructions to air navigation, the potential need for minimum standards, and, capitalizing on a number of growth opportunities in the Capital District. The recommended plan of action in this Business Plan rested on three primary initiatives: 1) Airport Branding and Marketing, 2) Hangar Development and Activity Growth, and 3) Expanded Partnerships

 

• Massena International Airport (NY) Business Plan: 2011

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for Massena International Airport in 2011. The business plan assessed potential means to improve the Airport’s financial performance, economic development, and operation. The plan focused on several components, including the Airport’s location near the Canadian border in northern New York, the benefits of attracting Canadian business for aviation and non-aviation development, the development of tourism associated with sport fishing, the attraction of business via low energy costs, and a number of other facility-related issues. The recommended plan of action from the report contained the following three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airport Branding and Marketing, 2) Attraction of Business/Corporate Operators and Expanding Service of Canadian Market, and 3) Hangar Development and Activity Growth.

 

• Denton Municipal Airport (TX) Business Plan: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for Denton Municipal Airport. Currently, the Airport is in transition from a relatively quiet general aviation airport to a significant training and corporate aviation center. Since 2006, activity at the Airport has tripled, thanks in part to international flight training operations that have located at the facility. In addition, a major aviation refurbishment and interior completion FBO (Jet Works) has located at the facility and now provides interior completions for the Italian aircraft manufacturer, Piaggio. In addition to these developments, gas wells are being drilled on Airport property, creating additional revenues of more than $1.5 million annually. The challenge for the consulting team is to develop a strategic plan that will wisely use the gas well revenues, suggest a new brand that encompasses the Airport’s future direction, and plan for the best use of the aeronautical and non-aeronautical property on the facility.

 

• Dutchess County Airport (NY) Business Plan: 2011

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform a business plan for Dutchess County Airport. The purpose of the business plan was to develop decision-level information that the County could use to chart the future course of the Airport. To accomplish this, an examination of the financial production of the Airport was made and reported in pro formas. In addition, the plan studied operational and managerial issues to determine if there were better or more efficient methods that could be used. The plan was founded upon an understanding of current activities at the Airport and set forth options to address a number of key areas: marketing for aviation users and non-aeronautical business, potential areas of development on Airport property, the possible need for new hangar space, the desire to increase corporate use of the facility, and capitalizing on a number of growth opportunities in the Lower Hudson River Valley. The recommended plan of action from this report rests on four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airport/Dutchess County Aviation Branding and Marketing, 2) Hangar Development and Activity Growth, 3) Non-Aeronautical Land Development, and 4) Expanded Business and Local Partnerships.

 

• Palo Alto Airport Business Plan, Palo Alto, CA: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan and Feasibility Study for the Palo Alto Airport. In this regard, the County of Santa Clara currently operates the Airport under a long-term lease from the City of Palo Alto. That lease expires in 2017. The City of Palo Alto is considering an early end to the lease (2011), if operating the Airport does not create any significant liabilities. The City is concerned about management structure, operating costs and revenues, and physical maintenance requirements. The Airport has 470 based aircraft and less than 2,500 feet of runway. The facility is located on 102 acres and has an FAA Air Traffic Control Tower. The Business Plan will provide the City with a plan that demonstrates the feasibility of various operating strategies and the costs and benefits of each. In addition, the economic impact of the Airport is desired as an output. Environmental constraints are significant toward any expansion of the facility and thus, maximizing revenues will have to be accomplished within the existing footprint of the Airport.

 

• New Braunfels Municipal Airport (TX) Business Plan: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for New Braunfels Municipal Airport. In this regard, the City of New Braunfels desires to move its Airport to the next level of corporate aviation service. They have secured a runway extension in 2013 that will lengthen Runway 13-31 to 6,500 feet. Also, the City-operated Air Traffic Control Tower has recently been accepted into the FAA’s Contract Tower Program. R.A. Wiedemann & Associates was asked to develop new minimum standards for the Airport and to develop plans for expanding the business base. The business plan recommended a proactive role of the City in marketing their services and improving the Airport brand. A name change for the Airport is being considered, as is the development of a video, internet upgrade, and marketing program. It is anticipated that land around the Airport will be annexed into the City in keeping with business plan recommendations.

 

• Jamestown Airport Business Plan, Jamestown, NY: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., has been selected as a part of a project team to perform an Airport Business Plan for Chautauqua County/Jamestown Airport in 2010. The Business Plan will recommend a plan of action to improve the Airport's financial performance and long-term viability of the Airport. The Plan will examine the growth of airline services, energy efficiency and clean technology applications, and recommend a self-sufficiency plan of action for the Airport. A market analysis will be performed including a comparison of Airport factors affecting the market service area including: facilities, services, aircraft, and operations; and rates and charges for aircraft storage, fuel, and other pertinent factors. The information that is developed as part of the market analysis will also be used for the preparation of the economic impact analysis.

 

• Plattsburgh International Airport Business Plan, Jamestown, NY: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., is selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for Plattsburgh International Airport in 2010. The Business Plan will recommend a plan of action to improve the Airport's financial performance and long-term viability of the Airport. The Plan will examine the growth of airline services, the lease rates and facility uses, energy efficiency and clean technology applications, and recommend a self-sufficiency plan of action for Plattsburgh International Airport. The plan will also include evaluating some of the following subjects: the economic impact of the Airport, market area services, airport accounting, business practices, administration, operations, revenue and expense trends and expectations, liabilities, assets, operational constraints, enhancing existing revenue sources, potential new revenue sources, alternatives for development, alternative sponsorship, alternative financing, capital investments, steps for recommended alternatives, implementation steps, local governmental financial support, and community support.

 

• Piper Memorial Airport Business Plan, Lock Haven, PA: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., was selected to perform a business plan for Piper Memorial Airport in Lock Haven, PA.  The airport is the former home of Piper Aircraft manufacturing.  That company relocated to Vero Beach, FL in the early 1980s after a significant flood damaged their factory and aircraft inventory.  Since that time, the airport has had difficulty in breaking even on a financial basis.  Revenues are primarily from hangar rents and fuel sales.  The airport has less than 4,000 feet and thus has difficulty attracting corporate aviation.  The business plan will focus on methods of increasing revenues, cutting costs, and bringing through-the-fence operators into a contractual relationship with the City.

 

• Griffiss International Airport Business Plan, Rome, NY: 2010

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for Griffiss International Airport in 2009. The Business Plan recommended a plan of action to improve the Airport's financial performance and long-term viability as a provider of jobs and general aviation services to Oneida County and the broader Utica-Rome metropolitan area. The Plan addressed a number of key areas: the Airport's economic impact, job creation on and off the Airport, the Airport's niche as a maintenance/repair/overhaul (MRO) station for large jet aircraft, marketing for aviation users and non-aeronautical business, high utility and facility maintenance costs, retro-fitting of aging structures with the use of green technology for new users, air service options, and capitalizing on a number of real growth opportunities in the near term.

 

• Lee’s Summit (MO) Airport Business Plan: 2009

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was selected to lead an Airport Business Planning project for the City of Lee’s Summit, MO. An airport master plan was developed in 1997 that recommended a significant expansion of the Airport over its current size. Land acquisition was performed to prepare for runway expansion from 4,000 feet in length to 5,500 feet. However, at some point in the process, the City Council became divided over the value of expanding the Airport. The Airport Business Plan was developed to help the City examine the financial viability of either implementing the expansion or leaving the Airport as is. The Business Plan did show the feasibility of performing the expansion, but in a different order from that shown in the airport master plan. Strategies for maximizing revenues were developed which would save over $500,000 in the near term. In addition to the Airport Business Plan, the City Council requested an analysis of the airport’s community value. That is, an analysis was requested that showed the economic contribution of the Airport in contrast to the possible conversion of Airport property to industrial uses. R.A. Wiedemann & Associates documented an annual economic impact of over $10 million in addition to an Airport asset value of $40 million.

 

• Orange County Airport Business Plan, Montgomery, NY: 2009

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Orange County Airport in 2009.  The Business Plan recommended action steps to improve the Airport's financial performance and long-term viability as a provider of general aviation services to Orange County and aircraft owners/operators in the Hudson Valley region.  The plan addresses a number of key areas: Airport management and operation, Airport improvement projects, stakeholder participation and engagement, enhanced Fixed Base Operator (FBO) and terminal services and amenities, improved market competitiveness, and Airport marketing and branding to attract more corporate aviation and non-aeronautical business.

 

• Decatur Airport Business Plan, Decatur, IL: 2009

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., was selected to perform an Airport Business Plan for Decatur Airport in 2009. Decatur Airport is designated an Essential Air Service (EAS) airport, which means that the Airport can receive federal subsidy for the support of scheduled commercial airline service. While some level of air service has been in place at Decatur between 1995 and 2009, passenger activity has seen a significant decline in recent years. The Business Plan sets forth options for improvements in a number of key areas: the existing scheduled air service and passengers volumes and the potential for reaching 10,000 annual enplanements to qualify for $1 million in entitlement funding from the FAA, the expansion of corporate aviation activities, improved surface access, the attraction of a full service FBO, the attraction of non-aeronautical development, and the identification of the Airport's service niche and greater market awareness.

 

• Lake Cumberland Regional Airport (Somerset, KY) Business Plan: 2009

 

R.A. Wiedemann was selected to perform a Business Plan for Lake Cumberland Regional Airport (formerly Somerset-Pulaski County Airport). One result of the Business Plan was the name change and re-branding of the Airport. The facility serves Lake Cumberland in south central Kentucky. In a typical year, Lake Cumberland receives over 7 million visitors. In 2009, scheduled airline service was added as the culmination of 5 years of work by R.A. Wiedemann and Associates. The branding effort was needed to help change the air travel patterns of local residents who have been driving to other airline airports to begin the air travel portion of their trips. The Airport Business Plan described the step-by-step processes and financing needed to transform a general aviation airport into an FAR Part 139 certificated airport. The Part 139 requirements included a security plan and fire fighting/rescue personnel plan for the new airline service. In addition, strategies to expand other lines of business, rent terminal space, and use non-aviation property for revenue production were developed. The financial feasibility of having the Airport Board serve as the Airport’s FBO (fuel only) was compared to the broader need for a full service FBO that provided aircraft maintenance and other services. The Airport Board now has a blueprint for operations for the next five years with contingencies for the potential loss of airline service in the future.

 

• The Civil Air Terminal (CAT) Business Plan, Dover, DE: 2009

 

The Delaware River & Bay Authority (DRBA) selected R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., to perform an Airport Business Plan for the Civil Air Terminal (CAT) located on the Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. Because the CAT is located on the Dover AFB and uses the base’s airfield, it is entirely subject to the operational requirements of the military. The Business Plan addressed the impact of the military interaction and security on the operations and growth of the CAT as well as focused on the following main issues: the expansion and strengthening of CAT ramp areas, the implementation of U.S. Customs Service screening to accommodate international air cargo shipments, the ability to react to recruitment of a commercial airline, the annexation of the adjacent Kent AeroPark tracks to grow the footprint of the CAT, the exploration of public/private partnership opportunities, the use of State and DRBA funding, the NPIAS Designation, and the improvements in access infrastructure.

 

• Delaware Airpark Business Plan, Dover, DE: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Delaware Airpark in 2008. The Business Plan assessed potential means to improve the Airport’s financial performance, economic development, and operation. This involved several components, including the Airport’s competitive setting, the potential private development of hangars, the highest and best use of Airport property, the benefits and costs of attracting corporate aviation, the Airport's role relative to the Civil Air Terminal, air access to Delaware's capital, and a number of other facility-related issues.

 

• Cape May County Airport Business Plan, Cape May, NJ: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., were selected to perform a Business Plan for Cape May County Airport in 2008. The Business Plan assessed the Airport’s ability to provide air transportation for the local tourism industry, its competitive setting, the benefits and costs of attracting corporate aviation, the potential benefits of the Airport Museum and the WWII heritage of the Airport, the potential for additional hangar development, the use of an FBO for supplemental airport management, working with the county government to enhance economic development through airport properties and services, rates and charges structures including fuel flowage fees, and the potential advantages of extending the runway to over 5,000 feet.

 

• Millville Municipal Airport Business Plan, Millville, NJ: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Millville Municipal Airport in 2008. The Business Plan addressed the Airport’s location relative to the recent construction of the New Jersey Motorsports Park (NJMP) and suggested methods for developing those ties and serving demand that will be generated by NJMP. It is anticipated that increased corporate and sophisticated personal use aircraft activity will occur as the NJMP grows in popularity. More than 100,000 spectators are projected for the 2009 season. This activity will in turn bolster fuel sales revenues, itinerant aircraft storage fees, aircraft maintenance, and on-airport employment. The Business Plan also addressed the changing role of the area's economic base as it moves toward tourism and hospitality industries, the benefits and costs of attracting corporate aviation, the potential for additional hangar development while preserving current historical Airport structures, servicing the air transportation needs of Millville and Cumberland County, and enhancing economic development through Airport properties and services.

 

• Schenectady County Airport Business Plan, Schenectady, NY: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Schenectady County Airport in 2008. The need for a business plan at Schenectady County Airport was precipitated by a desire on the part of the County to identify any additional operational, policy, or economic development strategies that could increase the benefit of the Airport to the County and Airport users. The Business Plan addressed the Airport's competitive setting, the ability of the Airport to support two FBOs, the desire of the Sponsor to examine renewal lease terms for the existing FBO, the potential for non-aeronautical revenue development at the Airport, the retention of the New York Air National Guard mission at the Airport, the potential for hangar development, and a number of other facility-related issues. The Business Plan set forth a recommended plan of action for the County to follow, which rests conceptually on five primary strategic initiatives: The continued recruitment of activity; FBO development and expansion; branding, marketing and promotion; non-aviation development on airport property; and retention and contingency strategies for the Stratton Air National Guard Base.

 

• Watertown International Airport Business Plan, Watertown, NY: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Watertown International Airport in 2008. The Business Plan examined potential development and optimal operations that would provide increased benefits to Watertown, Jefferson County, and aviation users. Watertown International Airport is a designated Essential Air Service (EAS) airport, which means that the Airport can receive federal subsidy for the support of scheduled commercial airline service. Until January of 2008, the Airport was served by Big Sky Airlines and were on its way to reach the 10,000 annual passengers necessary to receive $1 million in FAA entitlement funds for Primary commercial airport facilities. Under the new Essential Air Service agreement with Cape Air, scheduled service to Albany International began in September 2008. With the smaller nine passenger aircraft that Cape Air operates, it will be difficult to reach the 10,000 annual passengers. The Business Plan suggests ways that the Airport can partner with Cape Air to reach the 10,000 annual passengers needed in order to be eligible for the $1 million in FAA entitlement funds. The Business Plan also addressed the Airport’s competitive setting, the ability of the Airport and local market to sustain scheduled airline service volumes, the potential for partnering with Ft. Drum on aviation matters, the desire of the County to examine lease terms for the existing FBO, the potential for non-aeronautical revenue development at the Airport, and the potential for hangar development.

 

• Camden County NJ, Airport Acquisition Study: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc. was retained to help determine whether or not the Camden County Improvement Authority should acquire a privately owned, public-use airport. To perform this study, R.A. Wiedemann & Associates developed financial pro formas for the facility along with an in-depth economic impact assessment. Potential management structures were examined as well. Given the fact that the airport could not be expanded and that it served only a small portion of the existing businesses in the County the analysis had to rely upon the financial pro forma estimates to determine the viability of the facility. In this regard, it was determined that the airport could break even within five years, however, it would not be able to generate enough revenue to cover the local hare of capital improvements. The County was looking for a scenario that would permit them to own the airport, yet not have to contribute toward its operation and improvement. Because this could not be met, the County called off its bid to buy the airport, ultimately saving money in the long term.

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Watertown International Airport in 2008. The Business Plan examined potential development and optimal operations that would provide increased benefits to Watertown, Jefferson County, and aviation users. Watertown International Airport is a designated Essential Air Service (EAS) airport, which means that the Airport can receive federal subsidy for the support of scheduled commercial airline service. Until January of 2008, the Airport was served by Big Sky Airlines and were on its way to reach the 10,000 annual passengers necessary to receive $1 million in FAA entitlement funds for Primary commercial airport facilities. Under the new Essential Air Service agreement with Cape Air, scheduled service to Albany International began in September 2008. With the smaller nine passenger aircraft that Cape Air operates, it will be difficult to reach the 10,000 annual passengers. The Business Plan suggests ways that the Airport can partner with Cape Air to reach the 10,000 annual passengers needed in order to be eligible for the $1 million in FAA entitlement funds. The Business Plan also addressed the Airport’s competitive setting, the ability of the Airport and local market to sustain scheduled airline service volumes, the potential for partnering with Ft. Drum on aviation matters, the desire of the County to examine lease terms for the existing FBO, the potential for non-aeronautical revenue development at the Airport, and the potential for hangar development.

 

• William H. Mores State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for William H. Morse State Airport in 2008.  The purpose of the Business Plan was to recommend potential means of improving the Airport's financial performance, identify means to enhance economic development due to the Airport's presence, and to examine methodologies for increasing operational efficiency.  The Business Plan set forth a recommended plan of action for the State to follow, which rests conceptually on three primary strategic initiatives: attraction of corporate/business aviation, hangar development, and non-aviation development.   Many of the revenue enhancing strategies had additional benefits to the Bennington area, such as creating opportunities for economic development, the related impacts of increased property tax values to local government, and job creation for the local community. An economic impact assessment of the Airport was also performed as a part of the Business Plan.

 

• Hartness State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Hartness State Airport in 2008.  The baseline projections of revenues and expenses from the Business Plan showed a year 2012 operating deficit of $124,000.  In order to improve the financial performance of the Airport, the Business Plan addressed the following issues: the attraction of corporate aviation, airport branding, new or improved terminal services, amenities, and activities, hangar development options, runway safety area compliance, aviation and non-aviation property development, rates and charges/lease agreement structure, and additional/specialty FBOs based at the airport.  An economic impact assessment of the Airport was also performed as a part of the Business Plan.

 

• Edward F. Knapp State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Edward F. Knapp State Airport in 2008.  The Edward F. Knapp State Airport serves the Capitol of Vermont and the City of Montpelier and competes with five other airports within 30 miles of the Airport.  Because of the Airport’s importance in serving the State capital, the high level of competition in the immediate region, and the desire of the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) to efficiently manage the State's assets, this Business Plan looked at ways to improve the financial performance and operations at the Airport.  Some challenges that the Airport faced included constraints to airside and landside improvements, socioeconomic trends in the region, capital investment sources, and public support.  In order to overcome these obstacles, several revenue enhancement strategies were developed.  Elements of these strategies included:  the attraction of corporate aviation, Airport branding, new or improved terminal services, amenities, and activities, the development of additional hangar facilities, aviation and non-aviation property development that takes advantage of more than 21 available acres, and methodologies for increasing operational efficiency. An economic impact assessment of the Airport was also performed as a part of the Business Plan.

 

• Middlebury State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Middlebury State Airport in 2008.  Middlebury State Airport has the shortest paved runway in the state airport system.  The Business Plan recommended adding 1,200 feet to the useable runway length.  This would have an immediate impact on Airport activity and would enable more business type aircraft. Not only would current users of the Airport have increased safety margins, but it would also open the door to more corporate and business activity.  This could create a significant source of revenue for J & M Aviation (the Airport FBO) and the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) through hangar rents, fuel tax, and maintenance fees. Another issue that Middlebury State Airport faced was that community sentiments regarding Middlebury State Airport were mixed.  The economic benefits associated with the Airport were not always effectively communicated with the local residents.  In particular, the value of the Airport in serving a larger region may not be appreciated by the general public and Middlebury and Addison County representatives. Communication of these benefits helps to justify allocation of resources to the Airport.  In order to help portray these benefits, an economic impact assessment of the Airport was prepared.

 

• Newport State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., participated as part of a team on the Business Plan for Newport State Airport in 2008.  The Business Plan considered a variety of factors to improve and increase operations at the Airport. Several factors considered included impacts associated with a 1,000 foot extension to the primary runway, the construction of State-funded hangars, the provision of seasonal commercial airline service or scheduled air cargo service, increased marketing of the Airport and cross-marketing opportunities with Jay Peak, and the increased availability of U.S. Customs services at the Airport. Several sites at the Airport were also identified for future aviation and aviation-related development. A five-year financial outlook was developed based on the recommendations of the Business Plan and projections of future costs at the Airport show the potential revenue impacts as a result of these recommendations.

 

• Morrisville-Stowe State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., participated as part of a team on the Business Plan for Morrisville-Stowe State Airport in 2008.  The Airport currently has a 3,701 foot runway that is constrained on both ends by a waterway. In addition, current airport facilities are developed and constrained by a State Highway and several residential parcels. Due to the proximity of the Airport to the ski areas and resorts in Stowe, a significant number of jet operations occur annually at the Airport. The current runway length and several proposals for extension of the runway were considered as part of the Business Plan. While a 500 foot extension is shown on the Airport Layout Plan, an initial 300 foot extension was considered in the Business Plan, which would provide over 4,000 feet of runway for aircraft operations. In addition, other considerations, including the provision of a based aircraft maintenance service, and land acquisition of provide for the future expansion of facilities at the Airport, were presented. A five-year financial outlook was developed based on the recommendations of the Business Plan and projections of future costs at the Airport show the potential revenue impacts as a result of these recommendations.

 

• Franklin County State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., participated as part of a team on the Business Plan for Franklin County State Airport in 2008. With a 3,000 foot paved runway and a non-standard turf strip adjacent to the runway, the Airport competes for general aviation traffic with commercial service airports in Burlington and Plattsburgh (New York). Due to the Airport's location near Interstate 89 and the ease of access for pilots residing in the Greater Montreal area, a significant percentage of the 94 aircraft based at the Airport are owned by Canadian residents. As part of this Business Plan, the effects of a runway extension proposed by the current Airport Layout Plan were considered in terms of the operations and the fleet mix at the Airport. A runway extension would significantly increase the types of business aircraft that could utilize the Airport as opposed to the other commercial service facilities. In addition, the provision of U.S. Customs services, the relocation of ultralight operations, increased marketing of the Airport, and the introduction of a restaurant to the facility, were considered. A five-year financial outlook was developed based on the recommendations of the Business Plan and projections of future costs at the Airport show the potential revenue impacts as a result of these recommendations.

 

• Caledonia County State Airport Business Plan, VT: 2008

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., participated as part of a team on the Business Plan for Caledonia County State Airport in 2008. The Airport had been without a fixed based operator (FBO) since 1986, and was currently unattended. The Airport lacked an airport beacon and had non-standard runway lighting.  The Business Plan looked at the lacking facilities and presented options for future development at the Airport, including the attraction of a new FBO and aircraft maintenance provider, increased hangar space, and the provision of standard airfield lighting. In addition to potential development options, the Business Plan also discussed the potential for closure of the Airport as a result of few operations, the presence of other nearby general aviation airports, the difficulty in attracting an FBO, and potential costs associated with necessary future improvements, including airfield lighting, and a potential runway extension and rehabilitation.

 

• Camden County Airport Aquisition Feasibility Study, Camden, NJ: 2008

 

The Camden County Improvement Authority retained R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., as part of team to determine the feasibility of purchasing a privately owned airport. This airport is the last of seven facilities remaining in the County. The purpose of the study was to determine the value of the airport to the County, its ability to support itself without subsidy, and any physical expansion that could be accomplished. Our study determined that it was impractical to expand the airport due to environmentally sensitive areas (wetlands) and other existing transportation infrastructure (railroad right of way and highway). Options were presented to the County that showed potential feasibility, if the local share of capital improvement grants could be covered either by the County or State. The airport was not being used extensively by businesses. In essence, the argument was not compelling and we stated that as part of the recommendations.

 

• Rutland-Southern Vermont Regional Airport Business Plan, VT: 2007

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed an Airport Business Plan for Rutland-Southern Vermont Regional Airport in 2007.  The baseline projections of revenues and expenses from the Business Plan showed a year 2012 operating deficit of $342,800.  The Business Plan focused on a number of facets to improve the financial performance and utilization of the Airport.  These included: management/administrative actions, expanded business use of the airport, increased general aviation activity, improved scheduled air service, expanded development of airport property, and improved community awareness of the benefits that Rutland-Southern Vermont Regional Airport provides the community.  An economic impact assessment of the Airport was also performed as a part of the Business Plan.

 

• Morehead-Rowan County Regional Airport, KY: 2007

 

The purpose of the business plan for the new Morehead-Rowan County Regional Airport was to assist with the transition from the existing airport to the new 5,500 foot runway facility. The plan addressed a number of component issues, including the logistical issues surrounding the relocation of the airport, the operation and management of the new airport, the airport’s competitive setting, the desire to attract corporate aviation, the potential for hangar development, attraction of a Fixed Base Operator (FBO), the possible partnering with Morehead State University in a flight training program, and a number of other facility-related issues. The findings of the plan indicated that the best option for the Airport Board was to hire an FBO to operate the Airport. The negotiation terms would require the FBO to perform a number of functions including aircraft fueling and maintenance, flight training, and general airport upkeep. The FBO would likely require a management fee to perform these functions through the balance of the 5 year planning horizon. This fee may be reduced as activity increases at the Airport. Other important recommendations covered hangar development, the attraction of corporate aviation, the need to market local companies for the new airport, and the importance of flight training in developing new operational activity.

 

• Oswego County Airport Business Plan, NY: 2007

 

R.A. Wiedemann developed a business plan for Oswego County Airport, in New York State. It was the Sponsor’s desire to attract corporate aviation, develop new hangars, expand FBO services, restructure leases, and improve the Airport amenities by standardizing the ILS approach slope so it can be used by corporate aircraft. These items were covered in the business plan along with three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport and a strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation will bolster fuel sales revenues and on-airport employment. Corporate and business aviation represent a large, lucrative segment of the general aviation market. The location of the Airport near Syracuse creates a natural market area for corporate aviation. To attract corporate aviation, the Airport needs to improve its instrumental landing system and its services for corporate clients. 2) Hangar Development: In concert with the marketing of corporate aviation, the County should either develop or encourage the private development of aircraft hangars. Growth of the corporate aviation market segment will depend, in part, on the availability of adequate hangar facilities. It is estimated that 15,000 square feet of conventional hangar space will be needed to attract two corporate jets to the airport within the planning period. In addition, it is estimated that at least 20 T-hangar units will be needed over the next 5 years. 3) Flight Training: If SUNY Oswego leadership could be convinced of the feasibility of establishing an aviation management and flight training curriculum, the Airport would benefit from such a program. General aviation activity generated by the flight school will create jobs and revenues for the Airport, as more students take advantage of the college program credits. This activity should be encouraged by the County.

 

• Canandaigua Airport Business Plan, NY: 2007

 

The Sponsor, the Ontario County Industrial Development Agency (OCIDA), desired to examine alternate airport management structures, attract corporate aviation, develop new hangars, expand FBO services, restructure leases, and improve the Airport facilities by expanding the runway to 5,500 feet. The recommended plan of action included four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Renegotiate FBO Lease: The FBO was operating on a month-to-month basis on an expired lease. If the OCIDA is to position the Airport to become a corporate-capable facility, it will need the services of a competent FBO. Renegotiating the lease should present incentives to the FBO to perform better and to seek corporate clients. The elimination of the old percent-of-gross revenue lease in favor of a base rate plus fuel flowage fee agreement was recommended. 2) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport and a strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation will bolster revenues and on-airport employment. It is assumed that the runway will be extended to 5,500 feet by the year 2009. OCIDA is in a position to lease land for hangar development to interested corporate aviation clients. 3) Non-Aviation Property Development: A portion of the 55 acres controlled by the FBO can be subdivided non-aviation land uses, if it could be controlled by the OCIDA through a renegotiated lease or sublease arrangement. Roughly 20 to 25 acres of the Airport property could be released from aviation use since it is located behind the flight line with limited access to the airfield. This property, if developed for industrial purposes could generate lease revenue for the OCIDA in support of its Airport operations. 4) Management Structure: The “exit” strategy for OCIDA is to maintain ownership of the property but to use surrogate management for the Airport’s operation. The use of a part-time airport manager and the establishment of an independent Airport Board are recommended as methods of buffering OCIDA staff from day-to-day Airport operations. It is unlikely that the Airport will be sold or transferred to County or Village ownership in the near term.

 

• Tri-Cities Airport Business Plan, NY: 2007

 

R.A. Wiedemann developed a business plan for Tri-Cities Airport, in Endicott, New York. The Sponsor desired to examine alternate airport management structures, to construct new hangars, to expand FBO services, to possibly restructure the lease agreement, and to examine a number of other facility-related issues. These items were covered in the business plan along with three primary strategic initiatives: 1)Management Structure: The best option for the Village was to renegotiate a lease with an FBO to operate the Airport. The negotiation terms would reduce the management fees to the FBO and increase the Village’s percentage of revenues derived from hangar rents. If an FBO cannot be found under these terms, the second best option was for the Village to undertake the operation and management of Airport. The third ranked option was to continue the existing lease agreement unchanged. 2) Hangar Development: The primary source of increased revenues to the Village will come from the development of aircraft hangars. Given the market rates for hangar storage, new construction cannot be supported unless grants are used. The Village plans to construct a new T-hangar building in the summer of 2007 which will add immediate revenue to the Airport’s budget. A second round of construction should be undertaken as soon as grant money is available. It was estimated that an additional 10 T-hangar units would be developed by 2010. 3) Market Local Companies: To enhance the utility of the Airport and increase activity, the Village should market the facility to local companies including: Lockheed Martin Systems, BAE SYSTEMS Controls, IBM, United Health Services, the Lourdes Hospital, and any other significant user of air transportation. While these companies may use Binghamton Regional Airport for their employee transportation, their clients and vendors often use general aviation facilities that are closer to the businesses. These local companies are important to the well-being of the local economy and the Tri-Cities Airport can supplement their air travel needs.

 

• New Castle Airport Business Plan, Wilmington, DE: 2006

 

When commissioned to perform a business plan for New Castle Airport (Wilmington, DE), the airport served general aviation and the military. Airport management, the Delaware River & Bay Authority (DRBA) desired to see what could be done to position the airport for airline service. Four months after release of the plan, Delta Airlines began serving the airport with non-stop service to Atlanta. The recommended plan of action from this business plan rested on three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Attraction of Low Fare Airline: The attraction of a low fare airline to ILG is a major component of this business plan. Low fare service at ILG can compete with other low fare carriers at PHL and BWI. In addition, the development of airline service at ILG is projected to serve more than 275,000 air travelers each year. An added benefit to DRBA is that revenues from airline operations at ILG would more than double the current revenues within five years. Overall employment and economic development will increase as a result of airline service. 2) Attraction of More Corporate Aviation: The current vacancies in corporate hangar facilities requires marketing attention. By filling the existing vacant hangars, an additional $150,000 could be added to the Airport’s revenues. As a Part 139 certified airport, ILG is ideal for any corporate aviation operator that desires all-weather capability. Expanded marketing is a key to promoting ILG to corporate aviation interests. 3) Clientele Diversification

 

• Ft. Smith Regional Airport Business Plan, Ft. Smith, AR

 

As a non-hub commercial service airport, Fort Smith Regional Airport serves the Fort Smith Metropolitan Service Area, including the military mission of Fort Chaffee, Arkansas. In the latest BRAC (2005), Fort Smith Regional Airport was realigned to support training and operation of eighteen A-10 “Warthog” aircraft. R.A. Wiedemann & Associates performed a business plan in support of the Airport Master Plan, including the development of a video and airport brochures. The recommended plan of action from the business plan included five primary strategic initiatives: Retention of Airline Passenger Market Share, Long-Term Pricing Policy, Attraction of Corporate and Other General Aviation, Direct Airport Access, Non-Aviation Property Development.

 

• Sussex County Airport Business Plan, Georgetown, DE: 2006

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Sussex County Airport in Georgetown, Delaware. The recommended plan of action rests on three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Retain Existing Clientele: The Airport's largest employer, PATS/DeCrane, has made a commitment to move their corporate offices to Georgetown, DE. Increasing competition from domestic and foreign airports for Boeing Business Jet refurbishing and retrofitting should be countered with local incentives to expand at Sussex County Airport. Other corporate tenants, state police, FBOs, etc., are all important to the Airport's bottom line. 2) Hangar Development: Hangar development, both T-hangar and conventional, are significant contributors to the Airport's revenue stream. One method of increasing revenues is to construct more hangar space. This involves marketing and financing, but the economic development returns are large. For this business plan, it was assumed that 20 T-hangar units and 5 large conventional hangars could be developed over the next 5 years. Growth of the corporate aviation market segment will depend, in part, on the availability of adequate hangar facilities. 3) Staffing: The current staff is stretched to the limit in handling day-to-day management issues at the Airport. When the planning, marketing, and other functions are added to the mix, span of control issues are unavoidable. There is an immediate need for at least one more full time employee in the Economic Development Department who could focus solely on aviation matters, dealing with tenants, and activity associated with the growth of the Airport.

 

• Millington Regional Airport Business Plan, Memphis, TN: 2006

 

The Memphis Naval Air Station was realigned in the mid-1990s, losing their flight training mission. As a result, the airfield was transferred to ownership of the City of Millington, TN. Millington has one of the longest general aviation airport runways in the state - 8,000 feet. The airport has other impressive facilities - a full Instrument Landing System, Air Traffic Tower, and Fire Station. The business plan assessed the strategic position of the airport and its market niche. It was concluded that the airport needed a branding campaign that could promote the relatively new public-use status of the facility, and change the historical Naval identity associated with the city and its airport. The airport is within 20 miles of Memphis and can serve significant corporate aviation traffic without the delays or costs of Memphis International. The business plan produced marketing recommendations, a video, and full-color brochures.

 

• Summit Airport Business Plan, Middletown, DE: 2005

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Summit Aviation, the private owner of Summit Airport in Middletown, Delaware.  The business plan focused on Summit Aviation’s core business practice - avionics and airframe modification - along with several new strategic market directions.  The Airport employs more than 80 people and plays a vital role in the rehabilitation of the U.S. Army’s CH-47 Chinook Helicopters.  The business plan recommended improvements to several areas of the operation, along with new land use recommendations.  Also included in this project were videos and full-color brochures.

 

• Maury County Airport Business Plan, Columbia, TN: 2005

 

The Maury County Airport Board has undertaken a business plan and economic impact study for the Maury County Airport. The purpose of the plan was to examine potential development and optimal operations that may provide increased benefits to aviation users and the Airport Sponsors. Issues that were examined included the FBO financial stability, the use of the Airport by air cargo carriers, the need for hangar development, and economic development actions needed to support several nearby industrial parks. In 2004, air freight going to the Saturn plant through the Maury County Airport was reduced dramatically. This reduction was the result of greater use of other nearby airports for Saturn’s business. Actions needed to be taken to try to reverse this trend. As the most convenient local airport with the longest runway (6,000 feet), Maury County should be the logical location for most of the air freight operations for GM. Also, as a jet-capable airport, the corporate aviation in nearby Nashville should be a logical target of local marketing efforts. The business plan is being used by the Airport Authority to chart a path forward and restore financial performance at the Airport.

 

• Proposed Caroline County Airport Aquisition Study, Ridgely, MD: 2004

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., was retained to develop a business plan for the proposed Caroline County Airport acquisition. In this regard, Caroline County, MD was weighing the financial consequences of acquiring the privately owned, Ridgely Airport. The business plan analysis showed a near breakeven scenario for the near term, with a longer term potential for self-sufficiency. The proposed airport would augment the County’s industrial park, which was planned for an adjacent area. The results of the feasibility analysis led the County to begin the environmental process needed to purchase the facility. It is anticipated that the facility will be open to the public in the year 2010.

 

• Dansville Municipal Airport Business Plan, NY: 2004

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Dansville Municipal Airport in 2004. Issues considered by the plan included airport runway development, the attraction of corporate aviation, hangar development, economic development, and the assessment of the existing management structure. The recommended plan of action included four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airfield Improvement: The key element of the transformation of the Dansville Airport into a business-friendly facility will be the closure of Runway 18-36 and the extension of Runway 14-32 to 5,000' or greater. These physical improvements will enable the airport to serve corporate aviation and will also permit the development of both aviation and non-aviation land uses on the south side of the Airport. 2) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport and a strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation will bolster revenues and on-airport employment. 3) Adjustment of Fees: As the Airport becomes busier and more successful in attracting more sophisticated types of aircraft, the economic benefit of doing business on the Airport increases. This increase in value should translate into increased fees and rentals to the FBO, and in turn, to the Airport Sponsor. Thus, when economic conditions permit, it was recommended that lease rates be adjusted upward. This upward adjustment, including the institution of fuel flowage fees, will help to pay for operational expenses and capital improvements on the Airport. 4) Hangar Development: In concert with the marketing of corporate aviation, it was recommended that the Town either encourage the private development of aircraft hangars. In this regard, both corporate conventional hangars and T-hangars will be needed in the future.

 

• Genesee County Airport Business Plan, NY: 2004

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Genesee County Airport in 2004. Issues considered by the plan included the development of a professional flight school, the attraction of additional corporate aviation, additional hangar development, economic impact assessment, and expanded FBO services. The recommended plan of action included three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport and a strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation are expected to bolster revenues and on-airport employment. The proposed runway extension to 5,500 feet will place Genesee County Airport squarely in the business jet class market. The location of the Airport mid-way between Rochester and Buffalo helps the Airport serve corporate aviation in both of those metro areas. 2) Flight School: General aviation activity generated by the flight school was expected to create jobs and revenues for the Airport, as more students take advantage of the college program credits offered by Ravenaire. Ravenaire had teamed with Utah Valley State College to offer both 2 and 4 year degree programs from the Genesee County Airport location. It was recommended that this activity be encouraged by the County. 3) Hangar Development: In concert with the marketing of corporate aviation, it was recommended that the County either develop or encourage the private development of aircraft hangars. Roughly 45 percent of total revenues were derived from hangar and building leases. Growth of the corporate aviation market segment will depend, in part, on the availability of adequate hangar facilities.

 

• Hamilton Airport Business Plan, NY: 2004

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Hamilton Airport in 2004. Issues considered by the plan included an assessment of current management structure, attraction of additional corporate aviation, development of hangars, consideration of airport noise, airport maintenance responsibility, municipal tax issues, and economic impact assessment. The recommended plan of action included three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Renegotiation of the FBO Lease: The key for improved financial performance at the Airport will be the adjustment of fees through a new FBO lease. In this regard, it was recommended that the Village receive the major share of hangar revenues (90 percent), while paying the FBO a collection fee (10 percent). The new lease would also require an FBO to provide daily Airport management, aircraft maintenance, and fuel service. 2) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: A strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation will bolster revenues and on-airport employment. It was recommended that the Village initiate a direct marketing program for corporate aircraft owners within a 100-mile radius of Hamilton. 3) Hangar Development: Using FAA grants, it was recommended that the Village construct a 10-unit T-hangar to provide additional revenues for the Airport operation. Both corporate conventional hangars and T-hangars will be needed in the future. In marketing corporate aviation, one of two methods for conventional hangar construction was expected to emerge: a) Corporate interests construct a conventional hangar on leased property, or, b) The Village constructs the hangar with long-term lease agreement guarantees that will repay the Village for construction costs. Additional hangar development will contribute to the growth of the Airport and its aviation activity base.

 

• Perry-Warsaw Airport Business Plan, NY: 2004

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Perry-Warsaw Airport in 2004. Issues considered by the plan included an assessment of current management structure, additional hangar development, economic development, and community relations. The key issue for this airport, however, was the co-sponsorship by two towns, resulting in the lack of communications and substandard management practices. The recommended plan of action included three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airport Management Improvements: If economic development at the Airport is to move forward, the Towns had to come to grips with management and operation of the Airport. This meant establishing real lines of communication, authority, and responsibility. It also implicated the designation of an on-airport manager along with direct involvement in the mowing and snow plowing of the facility. In other words, things needed to change at the Airport if it was ever going to live up to its public investment. 2) Hangar Development: It was recommended that new T-hangar development be undertaken using FAA entitlement grants. During the planning period, these grants could be used to construct an 8-unit T-hangar. Revenues from this development could be used to decrease operating deficits at the Airport during the planning period. In the post-2008 period, it was recommended that the 6 older T-hangars be replaced and an additional 8 be constructed. 3) Market Airport to Supplement Industrial Base: It was recommended that the Airport be marketed along with industrial and business park sites as a part of Wyoming County’s economic development plan. The Airport should be increasingly business-friendly and cater to single and twin-engine business aircraft uses. This would include the improvement of the automated fueling facilities for business and personal users, improvement of all-weather instrument approaches, and snow removal services that would permit business users to come and go during inclement weather.

 

• Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Business Plan, Parkersburg, WV: 2003

 

With declining numbers of airline passengers and aviation activity, the Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Board retained R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., to perform a business plan.  The purpose of the plan was to recommend potential means to improve the Airport's financial performance, economic development, and operation.  The recommended plan for Parkersburg rested on four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Support and Encourage Local Airline Travel: Airport management already supports this concept and was encouraged to expand its efforts to include development of a volunteer phone bank at the Airport to respond to callers and find low airline prices locally, solicit group charter tours, and network with local businesses.  In addition, a high quality web site was recommended.  2) Attract Corporate Aviation: A significant set of Airport revenues come from the sale of fuel.  Corporate aviation represents a large user of fuel and as such, needs to be attracted via a marketing program to use the Airport.  3) Seek Lower Cost Fuel Supplier: A lower cost fuel supplier was identified that would result in significant cost savings to the Airport.  This would permit the Airport to lower fuel prices and still increase the profit margin on all fuel sales.  4) Develop Non-Aviation Property: The potential development of more industrial park area at the Airport can serve to attract jobs and industry while supporting the corporate aviation marketing efforts at of the Airport Authority.  If property not needed for aviation use in the future can be feasibly converted to industrial use, it will expand the revenue base of the Airport.

 

• Charlotte County Airport Business Plan, Punta Gorda, FL: 2003

 

Dr. Byers’ assisted airport staff with a comprehensive review of the Airport’s current and pro forma budgets and to develop a plan for reducing costs and improving revenues from both aeronautical and non-aeronautical activities. Specific areas for the Business plan included the development of vision and mission statements, a detailed (S)trengths, (W)eaknesses, (O)pportunities & (T)threats (SWOT) analysis and preparing a business plan for marketing non-aeronautical property through area real estate brokers and other resources. The project also included updates of the Airport’s Rules and Regulations and the Minimum Standards for Operation of Aeronautical Activities.

 

Adirondack Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Adirondack Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included airport financial performance, the potential increased use of the airport by athletes and tourists traveling to Lake Placid, the attraction of additional corporate activity, the assessment of the management structure, economic development of an adjacent industrial park, runway extension feasibility, and community relations.

 

The recommended plan of action incorporated four primary strategic initiatives:1) Stable Airport Management: The out-migration of based aircraft in the past was attributed in some measure to the changing Airport management and perceived lack of support from the Town leadership.  The Town changed its past activities and firmly supported the Airport management, however, it was recommended that the previous perceived instability be countered with steady, long-term leadership. 2) Attraction of Aircraft Maintenance FBO: The loss of Adirondack’s maintenance FBO in the mid-1990s signaled the decline in based aircraft and Airport activity.  To regain based aircraft and for the long-term viability of the Airport, a significant aircraft maintenance FBO was needed.  It was recommended that marketing be directed toward securing this type of on-airport business.  3) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: The bulk of Airport revenues came from the sale of fuel.  Corporate aviation represented a large user of fuel and as such, needed to be attracted to use the Airport.  The continuing development of the Adirondack Airport Business Park along with direct marketing efforts in Northern New York and Canada would serve to attract this business aviation segment.  The long runway length at Adirondack Regional Airport is ideally suited to take advantage of this market niche.  4) Attraction of More Charter Activity: Olympic athlete training facilities in the area attract up to 20,000 athletes, family, and media each year.  If as many as one quarter of these visitors used the Adirondack Airport via charter aircraft, the Airport may become eligible to participate in federal entitlement funding of up to $1 million annually on capital improvement projects.  The Airport would also benefit from increased aviation fuel sales and rental car usage.

 

• East Hampton Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for East Hampton Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included maintenance and upgrading of the existing facility, potential development of Airport property, strict interpretation of environmental laws, continued convenience for all users, and development of public service/intangible benefits of the Airport. Other issues include the potential release of property for non-aviation uses, the recent increases in jet and helicopter operations, and economic benefits of the Airport.

 

The recommended plan of action incorporated four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Existing Facility Preservation: Benefits derived from the Airport are dependent upon the active preservation of existing facilities and services.  Therefore, it was recommended that facility preserving actions be taken primarily for existing pavements.  2) Airport Property Use:  It was recommended that Airport property be used for both aviation and non-aviation purposes to enhance revenues and create economic development opportunities.  3) Industrial Road Leases:  With the FAA release of this property, lease revenues from non-aviation land uses could be increased through the rent-up of vacant parcels.  4) Intangible Assets: It was recommended that the Airport serve as a catalyst for community-benefit development such as recreational fields, an intermodal terminal, or a location for affordable housing.

 

• Potsdam Municipal Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Potsdam Municipal Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included the sharing of airport sponsorship with a municipality having a larger tax base, increased Airport financial performance, increased use of the Airport by area universities, attraction of corporate aviation, and “right-sizing” airport facilities to match demand.

 

The recommended plan of action included three primary strategic initiatives:  1) Develop Airport Infrastructure: Provision of fuel facilities and a conventional hangar were needed for the Airport to develop.  No appreciable growth in activity or use are expected to occur until these infrastructure items are constructed.  2) Attract FBO: For the Airport to grow, it was recommended that the Village set a goal of attracting a Fixed Base Operator to the facility.  The FBO would be the central focal point of all business and economic development activity on the Airport.  3) Attract Flight Training Operation: One method of increasing aviation activity, fuel sales, aircraft maintenance, and overall Airport use is to offer flight training.  It was recommended that student pilot training for Clarkson University ROTC, SUNY Potsdam, St. Lawrence University, Canton College, local high schools, and the general public could serve to increase the economic base of the Airport.

 

• Gabreski Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Gabreski Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included the integration of the Airport into the local economy, Airport infrastructure needs, local environmental concerns, jurisdictional Town-County issues, interaction with the Air National Guard, corporate aviation users, excess property release, and the economic benefits of the Airport. The recommended plan of action included six primary strategic initiatives: 1) Airport Appearance/Infrastructure: In order to keep existing clients and attract new business, the Airport pavements, lighting, and instrumentation systems must be physically maintained to permit all-weather use. It was recommended therefore, that more of the dilapidated former military buildings be removed, and issues such as snow/ice removal, landscaping, terminal building appearance and cleanliness, be addressed by Airport management. 2) Airport Planned Development District: Full development of the Planned Development District has the potential to exceed earnings from all aeronautical activities at the Airport. 3) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: A strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation was needed to bolster revenues and on-airport employment. Gabreski Airport is ideally suited to take advantage of this market niche. 4) Other Non-aeronautical Land Development: The large amount of Airport land area provided adequate space for other non-aeronautical development. Suggested land uses included storage and staging areas for small businesses serving eastern Long Island. 5) Continue to Serve Existing Client Base: Gabreski Airport’s existing client base was anticipated to provide up to 46 percent of future revenues. In addition, Airport tenants such as the Air National Guard provide jobs and millions of dollars in local economic impact. 6) Additional Airport Staffing: At the time of the study, the staff was strained to manage, market, and administer both the Airport and APDD. Therefore, it was recommended that the County add staff to the Airport to increase the service levels, response time, and administrative capacity.

 

• Warren County Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Warren County Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included the attraction of additional corporate aviation, expanded FBO services, additional hangar development, increased use by tourists traveling to Lake George and Saratoga Springs, improved airport financial performance, the feasibility of runway extension, and greater economic development. The recommended plan of action included four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Develop Non-aviation Airport Property: A 93-acre parcel of Airport property that was identified as not needed for future aeronautical use. This property was well suited to be developed for industrial/commercial purposes and would provide the Airport with an economic development base. The existing Airport Industrial Park had very little development area left and as such, would not compete with the new site. The development of this property could play a significant role in reducing the deficits at the Airport. 2) Attraction of New/Specialty FBO: The size and quality of Airport facilities at Floyd Bennett Memorial Airport require an FBO of significant investment and quality. To attract based aircraft and corporate aviation for the long-term viability of the Airport, a significant FBO operation was needed. This included the ability to offer high-end maintenance operations, corporate flight services and amenities, as well as executive charter and air taxi services, in addition to the normal FBO functions of fuel sales, flight training, etc. 3) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Corporate aviation represents a large user of fuel, an employer of on-airport personnel, and an engine for increased utilization of the Airport. It was recommended that corporate aviation be attracted to use the Airport. The development of Airport land for industrial/commercial use along with direct marketing efforts in the Albany area, Northern New York, Vermont, and even Canada would serve to attract this business aviation segment. 4) Development of Hangars: In order to attract more aircraft to the Airport and to provide a location for large aircraft maintenance, both T-hangars and a large conventional hangar needed to be developed. In addition, hangar development would increase the revenue base for the Airport and ensure the long-term income stream. These facilities were recommended by the Airport Master Plan Update and by our business plan as well.

 

• Wellsville Municipal Airport Business Plan, NY: 2002

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Wellsville Municipal Airport in 2002. Issues considered by the plan included the increased use by Alfred State College, the Airport’s final performance, the incorporation of an available 40,000 square foot incubator building, the attraction of additional corporate, the feasibility of runway extension, and the development of economic impacts. The recommended plan of action included four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport, including a runway extension and the development of a new terminal area signaled a strategic shift toward the attraction of more corporate aviation. Marketing for new corporate tenants and encouragement of fractional aircraft ownership by local companies was recommended to bolster revenues and on-airport employment. 2) Development of Aircraft Mechanics School: The development of an aircraft mechanics’ school on the airport as an extension of the current Alfred University mechanics’ program would serve to increase airport usage and provide another Airport tenant. Once in place, such a program could easily be expanded to include a flight school. 3) Non-Aviation Revenues: The Town was working to obtain an FAA release of Airport property to add to the AAEDC’s Air Industrial Park. The goal was to market and develop industrial/commercial property at the Airport. Revenues derived from the Park could be used by the Town in support of the Airport. 4) Maintain Relationship with Wellsville Flying Service: The Town benefits from the operation of the Airport by its FBO, Wellsville Flying Service. Significant cost savings accrue to the Town through the management and operation of the Airport by the FBO.

 

• Brookhaven Airport Business Plan, NY: 2001

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Brookhaven Airport in 2001. Issues considered by the plan included continued use of the Airport by Dowling College, expanded business use of the Airport, increased general aviation activity, development of Airport property, new and better access to the Airport from William Floyd Parkway, development of an overall Airport use plan, and continued good public relations with the community.

 

The recommended plan of action incorporated four primary strategic initiatives: 1) Attraction of Corporate Aviation: Physical improvements to the Airport and a strategic shift toward the attraction of corporate aviation was needed to bolster revenues and on-airport employment.  Brookhaven Calabro Airport is ideally suited to take advantage of this market niche.  2) TransTech Park:  As a part of the Brookhaven Center, TransTech Park was anticipated to attract both aviation and non-aviation tenants to the Airport complex.  It was recommended that development of this Park be encouraged and supported by the Town.  3) Non-Aviation Revenues: It was recommended that the Town attempt to market and develop industrial/commercial property on the Airport to help fund the ongoing operation of the facility.  4) Continue to Serve Small General Aviation Aircraft: Brookhaven Calabro Airport serves as an aircraft training facility through the Dowling College Aeronautics program, the local BOCES program, and private industry.  The Airport also serves as home to over 200 aircraft.  This portion of the business is vital to the future life of general aviation on Long Island.

 

• Randall Airport Business Plan, NY: 2001

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Randall Airport in 2001. Issues considered by the plan included expansion and development of a new ramp area, attraction of a full service FBO, residential access to the runway system, potential commercial/retail development space, compatibility with area land use, rates and charges, and the financial performance of the Airport. The recommended plan of action included four primary strategic initiatives: 1) New Terminal Area: It was recommended that a new terminal area be developed of the north-side terminal area, with easy user access for hangars, terminal building, and commercial space. 2) New Fixed Base Operator (FBO): It was recommended that the Airport Sponsor seek a full service FBO. 3) Commercial Development: Development of on-Airport and adjacent Airport property for commercial/retail space, hotel, and other professional business space was recommended. 4) Residential Airpark: The unique attributes of this Airport permitted the attraction of permanent resident airpark users with direct taxiway access to the Airport’s facilities, goods, and services.

 

• Sullivan County International Airport Business Plan, NY: 2001

 

R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., performed a business plan for Sullivan County International Airport in 2001. Issues considered by the plan included the potential for expanded business use of the Airport, more general aviation use, the attraction of potential commuter or air cargo carriers, the development of Airport property, the better use of existing facilities, and improved financial performance. The recommended plan of action included three primary strategic initiatives: 1) Window of Opportunity: A window of opportunity was foreseen in the form of relocated based aircraft from potential nearby airport closures. It was imperative that the Airport be ready to accommodate this new, potential demand through marketing and aircraft hangar development or acquisition. 2) Marketing Corporate Aircraft: It was recommended that the County hire a professional airport manager (American Association of Airport Executives accredited) and market corporate aircraft from the New York Metro area. 3) Non-Aviation Revenues: It was also recommended that the County attempt to market and develop industrial/commercial property on the Airport to help fund the ongoing operation of the facility.

 

• Greater Cumberland Regional Airport Economic Impact and Business Plan, MD: 1995

 

The Greater Cumberland Regional Airport is managed by the Potomac Highlands Airport Authority, created under an agreement between the governors of both Maryland and West Virginia. Due to the poor financial performance of the airport, R.A. Wiedemann & Associates, Inc., was selected to perform an economic impact analysis and 10 year business plan. Management believed that greater funding assistance and cooperation from both states would occur if the airport could be given a plan to attain financial self-sufficiency in a reasonable time period. As a part of the study effort, an extensive survey was mailed to 799 businesses and aircraft owners in the service area to determine local desires for air service and airport amenities. The results of the survey indicated a strong need for new air service between Cumberland and the Baltimore/Washington area. Cumberland was served by Liberty Airlines with 5 daily roundtrips to Pittsburgh International Airport. This service was appreciated, but from a pricing standpoint, Baltimore/Washington International (BWI) was significantly cheaper. Most of the traveling public were aware of the difference in fares and there is a significant portion of the local demand that is driving to BWI to begin the air portion of their trips. Over 53 percent of the business respondents to our surveys indicated that BWI service was essential to the area. In addition to recommending this service, the 10 year Business Plan made the air service issue a primary concern for fiscal performance of the Airport. Previous studies confirmed the need for air service to BWI.